seeing shapes

My painting lesson for this week addresses Shapes. So I’m seeing shapes everyone I go. It is unusual to have your vision filtered, shape-seeking.

rocks in snow

rocks in snow

gravestones in snow

gravestones in snow

shadow

I took some photos of the philodendron’s shadow on the living room wall. Something very appealing about the shapes.

IMG_0150

IMG_0151

coating of snow

Yes I know, it’s cold in the Northeastern US.

My rule of thumb: Never complain about the weather. Be happy to let the weather do whatever it needs to do.

One thing I feel though: the landscape should reflect the temperature. When it’s cold, there should always be a coating of snow.

coating of snow

coating of snow


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Question from Pascal Auclair: Can attention alter the world?

contemplating home

The word “home” has been on my mind.

Notes:

My cell phone has no service where we stay up in Maine. I am unlocated. I can’t record my walks.

We had a sense of dislocation where we stayed, although we are comfortable there. Part of being at home was missing. I’m not sure what this is. We didn’t spread out our belongings.

On the other hand, leaving in the dark of early morning felt like leaving home. Maybe I had made a home in the landscape by walking.

Being at home I notice my negativity toward it. With a sense of humility, I walked in the neighborhood. The humility came from knowing all the people who were at home in the neighborhood. I am one of them.

I think I have felt all my life that where I live is just temporary. Not a home. Is it a deficit in the homemaking instinct? Or my imagination?

At home on the cushion? In the studio? Online? In the office? Where do I feel the strongest sensation of being at home? In the woods? (but not at night)

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Leaving Wednesday for Florida. Wednesday to Tuesday. Away from home.

signifying nothing

Faculty of discrimination –
What is worth reading and what is not
What is worth paying attention to and what is not
What is worth listening to and what is not
What is worth spending time doing and what is not

Somehow life has become clogged by inputs and the discriminating faculty has been overwhelmed.

Then again, my starting point was pretty discriminating, so I don’t think I’ve regressed too much.

Interesting read over the holidays: Marie Kondo’s “The life-changing magic of tidying up; the Japanese art of decluttering and organizing.” I picked up this small book on impulse from a bookstore counter display, a gift for me. It is quirky – or maybe just Japanese – and personal. Her method centers around the emotion of “a spark of joy.” The last chapter was so lyrical I almost felt tears start to form.

I found this quote today reading an article about Ray Johnson. It seems related.

Johnson’s operative principle that language and visual data form enclosed systems of self-replicating “codes” that preclude original expression and prevent meanings beyond their sound and fury.

So so so so much input is sound and fury and so little “spark of joy.”

More from the article:

art operates not as a reassuring by-product of existence, or a sole commodity produced by one isolated person, but as a collaboration involving many people, correspondences in a humanistic sense as well as an aesthetic one—art as an open-ended undertaking, a shared state of being present to someone else rather than art as a hallowed object to be hung on a white wall.

Direct communication may be the biggest fallacy of the instant messaging era.

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Not Nothing, Siglio Press

frosty

Walked in even colder weather this morning. Our route was not as exposed to wind and had more interesting features, so I didn’t feel as cold.

We got a little lost and finally found ourselves at Abrams Pond. D knew how to get back from there. A lovely two hour walk on the last morning of the year.

I was monitoring the sensations of being cold, lost, interested, intrigued, curious, surprised (almost annoyed) by not being where I thought I was, unlost, and home.

Walking is a way to get to a different place, but also a way to get back to where you were.

Walking stories are this blog’s primary content for now. Weird. Unsettled. Something might happen.

Favorite forest photos:

little birch forest

little birch forest

frosty trail looking east

frosty trail looking east

quiet questing questions

sometimes i get the feeling that developing and practicing a craft has far reaching implications in our personal development as well. ..a window of sorts. an edge and a meeting point between the inside and the outside. ….all things being similar, the patience to understand your material, the thought process involved in problem solving… the quiet determination that perfects a thought … the research to connect the dots and make a vision materialize…..

to understand just one thing through and through answers so many other questions for me, and it would culminate in the ability to share that feeling… my never ending quest to answer my main question, is communication really possible?

“quilting for answers,” May 14, 2007, Spirit Cloth, Jude Hill

I am so taken with Jude Hill’s craft that I’ve started reading her whole blog back to 2006.

Side note: Blog software really needs to support rereading a whole blog in chronological order. Using the archives, I can read monthly in chronological order, but within each month, I have to read in reverse chronological order. It causes a whiplash effect as I see results then run into posts on planning, but it’s worth it.

I think my main question is related to hers. I would phrase it “is intimacy really possible?”

I am committed to developing personal symbols. This is a process of attention. First one: the heavy curly bracket.It really has an impact, even if there is nothing inside.

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